“Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by ‘Creep,’ Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing.”

The past few weeks have been a flurry of allegations involving a lawsuit between English experimental rock band, Radiohead, and American pop singer Lana Del Rey. Apparent legal complications followed after Lana’s second single, “Get Free” was found to bare eerie similarities to Radiohead’s 1992 debut single, “Creep.”

After the initial lawsuit allegations broke, new tweets have surfaced from the singer claiming, “Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by ‘Creep,’ Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing.” Del Rey even went as far as announcing to a live audience that the apparent lawsuit could result in “Get Free” being removed from her 2017 studio album, Lust For Life. This week a member of Warner/Chappell, Radiohead’s publisher, addressed the press in the following statement:

As Radiohead’s music publisher, it’s true that we’ve been in discussions since August of last year with Lana Del Rey’s representatives. It’s clear that the verses of “Get Free” use musical elements found in the verses of “Creep” and we’ve requested that this be acknowledged in favour of all writers of “Creep.” To set the record straight, no lawsuit has been issued and Radiohead have not said they “will only accept 100%” of the publishing of “Get Free.”

If the lawsuit is confirmed to be true, this may pose an awkward situation for Radiohead. The band forfeited partial “Creep” royalties and writing credits to English pop/rock band, The Hollies, for their 1972 song, “The Air That I Breathe” following a similar situation of resemblance. No further statements have been made by Radiohead or Lana Del Rey.

Written by Anthony Borders
Edited by Riley Witiw